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Holabird Sports


Eagnas Hawk 800
Eagnas Hawk 800

Evaluations of the Eagnas Hawk 800:

Naoyuki Tai, March 28, 2001:

   Place of purchase: 

   Date of purchase: 

   Warranty: 5 years

   Price: was $565

   Equipment:

6 point mount, upright, spring tensioner, dual-action swivel clamps

   Experiences:

This is the cheapest upright stringing machine you can buy.
So far I strung about 10 times with this machine.

Summary:
There are some shortcomings, but it is usable. There are better alternatives.

Mounting:
Head and throat mounting is a "screw down". You screw in the racquet support, racquet and racquet support and then screw down with a big wheel nut. Some say this is "not good", but, so far, I do not find any problems.
Also, after screwing down, you can move the head and throat mounting posts to adjust the pressure on the racquet in head and throat direction.
These screw based mounting needs some "guess work" about how appropriate the mounting is.
Head/throat mounting comes with some attachments for various thickness of racquets. However, none of attachements are good for tapered body. Some racquets (like my Yonex SRQ-500) have tapered body for inner side of face, and there is no mounting attachment for this racquet securely.
It works OK for box shape racquet (like original Prostaff).
Side four (4) mounts are absolutely joke. It comes with two kinds of supporting posts. One has several holding cut out and other is just a strait post.
Strait post slightly bends backward, creating upward stress rather than holding racquet. So, this is, unless you are desperate to hold the racquet in some way, joke.
The other shaped post works slightly better for supporting.
But, you have to screw down the four posts with screws from back of the machine. Because four posts moves independently, there is no way to hold the racquet evenly.
If left and right posts move in sync, you can hold the racquet evenly, but, this is not the case for Hawk 800.
Recently, I completely gave up using side mounts as it does little to support the racquet.

Turn table:
It is just a flat metal faces with one post in the middle. They are greased up. No fancy mechanism but, it works remarkably well so far. In future, I might have to grease up.
Because it is so simple, I can probably take care of that.

Clamps: It comes with 2 dual action swivel clamps. Clamps work OK.
Its base is held by one bolt and two nuts. Cheap. Sometimes you need to adjust how tight/loose the clamp base is.
Clamp and clamp base has a little play (which is unavoidable for this construction). It is not excessive but I do not like it.

Tension head: It's tension numbering on the base of tension head is very small and hard to read. (I have almost 20-20) Also, I am afraid the fade of numbering.
Tensioning itself is not super, but, fairly good. As long as you repeat the same string mounting on the tension head and pull at same rate, its tension is fairly consistent.
I measured the tension with calibrator and it is consistent enough.

Overall:
It gives you a solid feel and rather well built. (All metal.)
My biggest grief is: its side mounts are not very useable. You might be disappointed if you are expecting a six point mounting.
Also, main head and throat mounts are not adequate for tapered body.

If you have another $200, go for Alpha Axis or Gamma's spring tension. If you are paying close to $600, another $200 makes your investment much much better.


BC, January 13, 2002:

   Place of purchase: Eagnas

   Date of purchase: 01/2000

   Warranty:  

   Price: $565

   Equipment:

6 point mount, upright, spring tensioner, dual-action swivel clamps

   Experiences:

Have strung hundreds of racquets using this machine. Very good buy for the money. In my next machine, would like glide bar clamps and constant pull. Of course, will have to pay more money. You can't beat this machine for the price.


David, July 05, 2002:

   Place of purchase: Mail order from the distributor in LA

   Date of purchase: 05/2002

   Warranty: 1 year

   Price: $580

   Equipment:

6 point mount, upright, spring tensioner, dual-action swivel clamps

   Experiences:

I returned it after I got it for just one day! It is useble if you have the patient to spend two hours to mount your raquet. It very stupid design. Return cost 15% of the price. I would not buy it again. Just to be fair I heard their most expensive models are OK.


Dan Davis, July 11, 2002:

   Place of purchase: Tennis Warehouse classifieds

   Date of purchase: 07/2002

   Warranty: used

   Price: $300

   Equipment:

6 point mounting, upright, spring tensioner, 2 fixed clamps

   Experiences:

Having used an very inexpensive table top stringer for 12 years I found the Hawk 800 to be like stepping up to a caddy from a VW beetle. The tensioner is quick and easy and the clamps are fantastic. I haven't had experience with any other machines (other than my inexpensive table top model) but this one is very pleasant to work with.


Gene Ogino, July 27, 2003:

   Place of purchase: Manufacturer

   Date of purchase: 07/2003

   Warranty: 5 years

   Price: $495

   Equipment:

upright, spring tensioner, 6 point mounting, 2 swivel clamps

   Experiences:

I went from a Klippermate table top to an Ektelon Model F upright to the Hawk 800 upright, and I agree with all that Naoyuki Tai, Mar 28/01, said about the Hawk 800, both the positives and negatives. One negative that was missed was the fact that the string gripper on the tension head is about 2 inches below the level of the racquet, so it not only is awkward to put the string into the string gripper, but it exerts unnecessary stress on the frame because the string pulls downward when you turn the crank. I've only strung about 10 racquets with this stringer so far, and I have not broken any frames because of this downward pull, but I believe it is a serious flaw in the design. Also the crank is on the left side of the tension bar and I find this awkward, although it seems the other machines are the same.
I also had to request new mounting posts because one of them was too fat and the frame retainer would not slide down, and that reflects a little on their quality control. When I asked about the height difference of the racquet and string gripper, the tech suggested I remove the washer (thickness 1/16 of an inch). I hope he was trying to be funny.
I would recommend you try another stringer unless you only do a few racquets a year, in which case a table-top drop weight will do just as well. Thank god I didn't sell my Ektelon.


Mike H., October 28, 2003:

   Place of purchase: Eagnas

   Date of purchase: 08/1998

   Warranty: 5 years

   Price: $695

   Equipment:

Manual crank tension, upright, 6 fixing points, 2 swivel clamps, reel holder, knot tensioning, 360 degree swivel, metal tool tray

   Experiences:

I have had very few problems with this stringer, it is easy to use, probably easier than any stringer I have ever used (except the Neos 1000). If I ever replace this stringer it would be for the upgrade to the Neos. This is the second stringer I have owned, the other being the Klippermate, which was ok, just not good for a large volume of stringing. Parts on that stringer wear out quickly.


Naoyuki Tai, October 10, 2004:

   Place of purchase: Eagnas

   Date of purchase: 03/2001

   Warranty: 5 years

   Price: was $565

   Equipment:

6 point mount, upright, spring tensioner, dual-action swivel clamps

   Experiences:

This is a follow up to my first review. I posted a review three years ago as the first review of this machine.
After three years of use, my first impression still holds true. OK construction. Lousy racquet mounting. Tensioner works well. One thing that annoys me now is that the base of the turn table is held by a screw. It gets loose and the whole table wobbles after a while. I screw it tight as much as I can but after a while it starts to wobble again.
After three years of use, I am starting to want to sell this and would like to move onto a little better machine.


Ef, December 13, 2005:

   Place of purchase: Manufacturer

   Date of purchase: 2000

   Warranty: N/A

   Price: was $565

   Equipment:

6 point mount, upright, spring tensioner, dual-action swivel clamps

   Experiences:

I've been stringing racquets for 19 years. I'm a 5.0-5.5 USTA ground stroker with national and Div I college tennis experience. I mention this because I am anal about my tensions and never let the staff string them in college.
I have strung on the venerable Rayco Dropweight, Ektelon hand crank, Alpha electronic pull, and my current one, the Hawk 800. I've also strung tennis and racquetball racquets. Looking at some of the other reviews, there are SOME things I agree with. Overall, I don't see where people are getting the quality gripes from. My Hawk 800 is one heavy piece of solid metal. The support arms are metal as well and don't warp when you pull tension. The tensioner has been working flawlessly since day 1 and I check it monthly with a Gamma tensioner. The tool assortment they gave me was on the cheap side so I invested in some quality Craftsman tools (needle nose pliers, clippers, awl, etc). The clamps could have been a bit better quality (the Ektelon and Alphas in my experience were thicker and head metal locks) and the Hawk 800 comes with metal clamps with plastic locks (they do give you extra ones). That said I have not had a problem with the clamps nor have I had to replace the plastic locks. I'm on year 6 and I'm using all the original equipment and settings right out of the box. You may have to tighten the clamps if you're working with 18 gauge string but you'll have to do that with any stringer. Despite these few areas where the tools or clamps could have been better quality, they definitely do the job well, they last, and they are the best AT THIS PRICE POINT. Sure you could spend a bit more and get the thicker clamps or different mounting design... but factor in your payback period for that expense. I HAVE NOT BROKEN A SINGLE RACQUET ON THIS MACHINE. I agree that the tensioner pulls downward instead of straight out but that's not too big a deal and not drastic enough to warrant worry in my opinion. I'm several grand richer b/c of this machine so give it a thumbs up... I don't see the value of spending several hundred dollars more for a brand name when the components are for the most part manufactured by the same people or using the same design with similar quality.


Note that the information on this page reflects the personal subjective opinion of the evaluators. If you disagree, please send in your own opinion.